hiddenhype:

fuckinq:

"Wanna watch a movie?"

Mannnnnnn. Mangas.

Timestamp: 1409518985

hiddenhype:

fuckinq:

"Wanna watch a movie?"

Mannnnnnn. Mangas.

loltias:

Seeing people the same age as you doing awesome things with their lifeimage

(via fivecentthoughts)

xxyxxxyxx:

ホイットニー サンダーズ

(via etrvn)

Timestamp: 1409242141

xxyxxxyxx:

ホイットニー サンダーズ

(via etrvn)

(via etrvn)

(Source: unitedbyblue, via yourkirsten)

(Source: chahooo, via ayeitsjohnn)

The Deliverers of Death
By: Cole Hermida

There is something innately strange about the way our society responds to a celebrity’s death. It is something that is not entirely wholesome or righteous but a feeling that is riddled in twisted thoughts and dark satisfactions. Despite the fact that death indeed marks an end, it gives birth to the shadow of the person who has passed. This shadow opens up its arms and provides the public with a sanctuary that is defined by nostalgia and past memories of the departed. Through its comfort, we become one with this shadow and fool ourselves into thinking that we knew the person and most importantly, that they were ours to keep. Nevertheless, we are wrong.

You see, when someone dies, it is a private matter. Yes, they may have been surrounded by friends and family. And yes, they may have lived a rich life full of people they loved. But at the end of the day, they are the only ones experiencing the full extent of death and the answers that lie beyond their final breath. However, as a celebrity, that is not entirely the case. When a famous person dies, it becomes a death that is examined and judged by millions of people. It becomes a Facebook status, a Tweet, a Tumblr post, an Instagram picture and a YouTube video tribute. It forms this metaphorical shadow that overcasts the death itself. Instead of acknowledging the death, we find comfort in knowing that other people know. 

So why do we do this? Well, part of me thinks that the reason why we post and inform is because that is how Hollywood trained us to respond. For years now, this Emerald City of fame and fortune has been a breeding ground of human objectification. Whether it is how women are portrayed on television or how men should aspire to behave, Hollywood steals, redefines and objectifies human existence. This concept applies to celebrity deaths because they become something we can pass along and talk about around the water fountain. If it was your grandma or mother who passed, will you so willingly talk and dissect its occurrence? Of course not! We would stay quiet, collect our thoughts and grieve. Sadly, when it comes to celebrity deaths, it is almost as if their suffering is our own delight, our Monday morning wake me up and our instant conversation starters.

We become deliverers of death, bearing sad news for the enjoyment of others.

(via flame0n)